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Today I placed an offer for a website. I have a website on Ancient Greek Mythology, and while I was checking out my referral links I noticed a few keywords that were pretty good. From a webmasters point of view, good keywords are like having your steak done just right- it’s the bees knees, baby. Anyway, I found another website (www.mythweb.com) that had a tremendous amount of information available. For someone like me, who in this instance is building a website purely out of interest (with only a few AdSense ads acting to make a few cents every now and then), MythWeb is great.

The information on that website would blend perfectly with what I am trying to create, and so today I wrote the webmaster an e-mail explaining who I am, my website (www.mythologymadness.com), and then I asked if he’d like to sell his website. Now, his website has no monetization on it at all, so I suspect that he’s been maintaining it simply out of interest. I would do the same. I have no interest in trying to heavily monetize the website, as for me, the real value is in displaying the information so that others may learn about one of my deepest fascinations- Ancient Mythology.

Sorry if I bored you a bit with the story, but there is a point to it. For most people, value often comes with a price tag attached. Vehicles, paintings, websites, houses, antiques, and even their personal lives, all have a dollar figure attached. That’s just how it is. For those same people, though, there are other things that simply don’t have a dollar sign attached to them. Perhaps it’s a piece of jewelry, a stuffed animal, or an old photograph. Either way, they may part with these things for a monetary price, but it is going to be far above what anyone else would value that particular item at.

Personal value is very important, perhaps even more-so than a monetary one. Giving something a high personal value usually equates some some significance or history behind it, and in my case, I wouldn’t part with those things. Will the owner of MythWeb allow me to purchase it? It’s doubtful, as if he places a lot of personal value in it I may not have enough money to convince him to part with the website. But, if he does, I’d give it the same value as he has.

I wonder if there’s an exchange policy on personal value? ;)

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4 Comments »

2008-02-09 09:26:39

[...] Original post by Career Ramblings [...]

 
Comment by Rob Malon
2008-02-11 07:43:33

Excellent post. I just scheduled a post of my own for later this week that touches on the topic of creating websites for fun FIRST. After all if you don’t enjoy SEO, SEM, coding, or the topic your website is on, you will never have the attitude to push beyond the average Joe. Thus the personal value of your website must be very high, at least when starting out.

 
2008-02-11 12:31:57

A lot of people don’t place enough personal value in their possessions. The result is a lot of people selling themselves short, which is something that someone should never do to themselves.

Pay yourself first, be it with money or with personal accomplishment.

Comment by Shane
2008-02-11 19:27:43

That’s so true in this age of cheap crap from Walmart. It’s difficult to put any personal worth into something you know (and expect) will fall apart next week.

I’m always more satisfied when I buy quality stuff.

 
 
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