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Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, despite all of the posts that I’ve made about post-secondary education and it’s benefits (and sometimes, lack of), I’ve bit the bullet and registered for classes. Not regular classes, as I’ll never do that again, but continuing education classes. Now, before you go “what the hell is the point of that?” (as my father did), there is a method to my madness.

First, growth is important to me. Just as I like to watch my affiliate stats grow (as opposed to shrink), growth as a person is important. I decided a few days ago that it was important to me to continue my education in a direction that provides me the largest benefit. Instead of taking a predetermined degree program I’ve decided to try a different approach: pick and choose the classes that I want to take.

One thing about becoming a university student that I never enjoyed was the amount of time I had to invest in classes that I had absolutely no interest in nor saw any career benefit from. Unfortunately, these classes are often a required portion of a degree program and are impossible to avoid if you ever plan to graduate. This realization, coupled with the cost of supplies, tuition, and textbooks, makes taking these classes inconvenient at best, and a pain in butt otherwise.

But continuing education… I see a lot of value there. For example, this “semester” I am taking an economics class, an accounting class, and a negotiation fundamentals class- all things that I personally find interest in and have a clear career advantages. Everyone should know the theory behind economics, learning accounting is always a good thing, and who doesn’t want to be able to negotiate better? Exactly, value.

Of course, taking a bunch of continuing education classes will not get you a degree, but then again, they often are not the same classes found within the general curriculum. The real beauty of continuing education classes is that they are often designed to cut the fluff and get straight to the point- they are geared towards professionals, people looking to expand their qualifications, and people that do not have the time to dedicate to attaining a degree through conventional means. The classes get started, convey the material that they need to convey, and conclude. If you are taking a class about negotiation, as opposed to learning about the theory of negotiating, the mechanics of language, and other somewhat relevant but not crucial information, you’ll learn about the variables of negotiation, how to control the situation, and understanding the other parties to further your negotiation advantage. Now that, that I like.

If you find that you have some time in the evening that you are currently dedicating to video games or the television, why not pick up a few con-ed classes? The advantages are numerous, and it just might open your eyes a little. The last time I took con-ed classes (this time last year) it proved to be the inspiration I needed to launch a successful business that has since netted me nearly $40,000 in profit passively- well worth the $250/class cost of admission as far as I’m concerned.

Go on- live a little.

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3 Comments »

Comment by Clapton
2008-01-08 15:47:13

Hello Cameron I like this article and think like you.

 
Comment by career advancement
2008-01-15 16:04:38

sounds like application training. just learn what you need to learn, forget about trying to categorize what it is…right? good luck!

 
Comment by Toronto Patterned Concrete
2008-02-11 12:34:02

Don’t forget to mention trandespeople and skill laborers. A man who lays tile may not need to know how to build a wall, but rather simply how to lay tile so that it is parallel and square.

 
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